Jan. 24th, 2017

Fact

Jan. 24th, 2017 05:55 pm
xaminmo: (Josh 2014)
fact (in law) - The truth about events as opposed to interpretation.
fact [fakt] n. - a thing that is indisputably the case.

The usual test for a statement of fact is verifiability. Scientific facts are verified by repeatable careful observation or measurement.
xaminmo: (Josh 2014)
Authoritarian personality is a state of mind or attitude characterized by belief in absolute obedience or submission to one's own authority, as well as the administration of that belief through the oppression of one's subordinates. It usually applies to individuals who are known or viewed as having an authoritative, strict, or oppressive personality towards subordinates.

After extensive questionnaire research and statistical analysis, Canadian psychologist Bob Altemeyer found in 1981 that only three of the original nine hypothesized components of the model correlated together: authoritarian submission, authoritarian aggression, and conventionalism.

Bob Altemeyer conducted a series of studies on what he labeled right-wing authoritarianism (RWA), and presents the most recent analysis of this personality type. The focus of RWA research is political preferences as measured through surveys, that suggest three tendencies as noted in attitudinal clusters. These are: 1) submission to legitimate authorities; 2) aggression towards sanctioned targeted minority groups; and 3) adherence to values and beliefs perceived as endorsed by followed leadership.

Jost, Glaser, Kruglanski, and Sulloway (2003) have proposed that authoritarianism, RWA and other similar constructs of political conservatism are a form of motivated social cognition. These researchers propose that conservatism has characteristics similar to those of authoritarianism, with resistance to change, and justification for inequality as the core components. In addition, conservative individuals have needs to manage uncertainty and threat with both situational motives (e.g., striving for security and dominance in social hierarchies) and dispositional motives (e.g., terror management and self-esteem).


Adorno, T. W., Frenkel-Brunswik, E., Levinson, D.J., Sanford, R. N. (1950). The Authoritarian Personality. Norton: NY.

Baars, J. & Scheepers, P. (1993). "Theoretical and methodological foundations of the authoritarian personality". Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, 29, pp. 345–353.

Kirscht, JP, & Dillehay, RC. (1967). Dimensions of Authoritarianism: A Review of Research and Theory. University of Kentucky Press: Lexington, TN.

Zillmer, E. A., Harrower, M., Ritzler, B.A., and Archer, R.P. (1995). The Quest for the Nazi Personality: A Psychological Investigation of Nazi War Criminals. LEA Hillside, NJ

Wiggins, J.S. (1980). Personality and Prediction: Principles of Personality Assessment. Addison-Wesley. Reading, Mass.

Kreml, William P. (1977). The Anti-Authoritarian Personality. Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press.ISBN 978-0-08-021063-6.

Altemeyer, B. (1981). Right-Wing Authoritarianism. University of Manitoba Press. ISBN 978-0-88755-124-6.

Altemeyer, B. (1998). The other "authoritarian personality". Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 30, 47-91.

Coolens, Breeon (2006). "The Authoritarian Model: Who is He and Why is He Here?". Scandinavian Journal of Modern Psychology. 8(12): 314–27.

Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Authoritarian_personality
xaminmo: (Josh 2014)
This is a cool term: Integrative Complexity. I stumbled onto in in political research, but it's not specific to politics. I had a hard time defining my specialty. I don't handle well a large number of things, but I can handle one or two things that are very complicated.

REF:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrative_complexity

The reason I don't handle large numbers of things well is because I'm slow to load information into working memory, and when I change gears/topics, it completely flushes what I was working on, rather than loading in some side area.

Geeks call this "loss of state", or a cache miss after context switch.

Research shows it takes, on average, 23.25 minutes to resume an activity after being interrupted. Other studies indicate you lose 20% time to context switching per project, based on an 8 hour day. So, 2 projects get 40% each, but 5 projects get only 4% each.

That seems a little extreme, but it's based on programmers, who also have to maintain a large amount of state.

REFS:
https://insights.sei.cmu.edu/devops/2015/03/addressing-the-detrimental-effects-of-context-switching-with-devops.html
https://www.fastcompany.com/944128/worker-interrupted-cost-task-switching
https://blog.codinghorror.com/the-multi-tasking-myth/
xaminmo: (Josh 2014)
I've had a rename token for years, and finally cashed it in.
jdsdavis was not free (squatter), but joshdavis was.

So, going to generic.livejournal.com, or xaminmo@livejournal.com, now goes to joshdavis.livejournal.com.

In theory, all of my friends, and posts, should be here. Just a rename, not a move.

I'm getting old. :p

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